Comfort Independent School District

Skip to main content
Parent Resources » CES@Home Resources

CES@Home Resources

CES students picked up instructional packets from school beginning on 3/25/2020 containing the work you need to complete.  If you did not pick up an instructional packet and need one because of not having internet access, then you should contact your campus office at 830-995-6410.  Phone messages will continue to be checked daily.  In the near future, we will communicate another time to pick up additional material, depending on how long the school closures continue. 

 

Some work is also provided online.  CES teachers are in the process of determining how many students have access to technology and to the internet to complete school at home work in this manner.  The campus will communicate with parents about how to use this platform to submit assignments if available for families. 

 

For students who are completing the take home packets, they can email the assignment to their teacher if they are able to take a picture or scan their completed work with a smart phone.  For students who are completing the take home packets and do not have access to a smart phone to submit their work through email, we are working on setting up a drop off location on each campus for this work.  Campus principals will share more details about this next week. 

 

CES Contact Information:

 
Family Activities by Grade Level

Literacy

    • Read 20 minutes a day.
    • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
      • an important part of text.
      • a connection made to the text.
      • a question about the text.
      • the problem and resolution of the story (literary text only - fiction, poetry, drama).
      • the central idea and details to support it (informational texts only - nonfiction, persuasive).
      • a conclusion that can be drawn from the text.
      • something that could be added to the text to extend its message.
      • something learned from the text

 

Math

Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Go on a scavenger hunt around the house (or even through different picture books) and find different objects/pictures for all the different types of quadrilaterals.(parallelogram, square, rectangle, rhombus, trapezoid, kite)
Building
      • Have your child build and name all the different quadrilaterals with Legos, toothpicks, crayons, pencils, straws, etc.
Physical Activities
      • While doing physical activities (e.g. walking from one end of a room to another, hopping, jumping jacks, going up and down stairs), keep track by skip counting by 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s,10s, 11s, and 12s. If you have access to an outdoor space, have your child create a hopscotch path. If you’re indoors, create a number path by writing on cardboard boxes or sheets of paper and have students skip count by different amounts. 
Cooking and Food
      • Have your child help out in the kitchen by measuring out ingredients and determining the amount of ingredients would be needed if you double, triple, or quadruple the recipe.  Have your child identify information from the nutritional facts and solve problems such as if you had 3 servings of these cookies, how many calories would that be? How many milligrams of sodium are in the entire box of cereal? How do you know? Have students create an addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problem using the nutritional facts from one of their favorite foods/snacks.
Shopping and Money
      • Have your child plan a meal using a grocery ad or online shopping and calculate the total cost. Give your child a pretend budget to plan a trip and they have to calculate all the costs and what they could do on the trip with the budget.

 

Science

INVESTIGATE: 
      • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world.  It may sound something like:
      • Does the kind of material used to insulate a refrigerated can of soda affect its temperature change?
      • Does the slope of the surface affect the rate of water erosion?
      • What role does a decomposer have in a Food Web? 
      • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
      • Be sure to make observations and collect data. 
      • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words. 
      • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
      • Research or test your new questions.
EXPLORE: 
      • Learn about decomposers and make a Soda Bottle Compost.
 
Social Studies
      • Create a map of an area larger than your neighborhood, such as the city of Plano or the state of Texas
      • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know
      • Read about a historical figure and discuss or write about their contributions
      • Read about a current event (newspaper or online) and write about the event. Discuss ways the student would inform the public about the event.

Literacy

  • Read 20 minutes a day.
  • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
    • an important part of text.
    • a connection made to the text.
    • a question about the text.
    • the problem and resolution of the story (literary text only - fiction, poetry, drama).
    • the central idea and details to support it (informational texts only - nonfiction, persuasive).
    • a conclusion that can be drawn from the text.
    • something that could be added to the text to extend its message.
    • something learned from the text

 

Math

Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Go on a scavenger hunt around the house (or even through different picture books) and find different objects/pictures to represent all the different two and three dimensional figures.
Building
      • Have your child build different two and three dimensional figures with Legos, blocks, cans, boxes, toothpicks, etc.
Physical Activities
      • While doing physical activities (e.g. walking from one end of a room to another, hopping, jumping jacks, going up and down stairs), keep track by skip counting by 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s,10s, 11s, and 12s. If you have access to an outdoor space, have your child create a hopscotch path. If you’re indoors, create a number path by writing on cardboard boxes or sheets of paper and have students skip count by different amounts.
Cooking and Food
      • Have your child help out in the kitchen by measuring out ingredients and determining the amount of ingredients would be needed if you made two batches or three. Have your child identify information from the nutritional facts and solve problems such as if you had 3 servings of these cookies, how many calories would that be? How many milligrams of sodium are in the entire box of cereal? How do you know?
Shopping and Money
      • Have your child look at the grocery ads or online and have them determine what they would purchase if given a specific amount of money. You can require they purchase a specific number of items. In addition, have students determine the change they should receive after purchasing their items. Give your child a recipe and have them look online or in a grocery ad to determine the cost of all the items and calculate the total cost to prepare the recipe.

 

Science

INVESTIGATE: 

      • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world. It may sound something like:
      • What is the best way to keep an ice cube from melting?
      • Does salt affect the freezing rate of water?
      • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
      • Be sure to make observations and collect data. 
      • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words. 
      • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
      • Research or test your new questions.

EXPLORE: 

      • What traits can be inherited? Learn about Hereditary Traits then observe the people around you for some common inherited traits.
 
Social Studies
      • Make daily calendars and timelines
      • Create a map of your neighborhood or school
      • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know
      • Read about a historical figure and discuss or write about their contributions

Literacy

  • Read 20 minutes a day.
  • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
    • an important part of text.
    • a connection made to the text.
    • a question about the text.
    • the problem and resolution of the story (literary text only - fiction, poetry, drama).
    • the central idea and details to support it (informational texts only - nonfiction, persuasive).
    • a conclusion that can be drawn from the text.
    • something that could be added to the text to extend its message.
    • something learned from the text

 

Math

Creating Numbers
      • Have your child roll 3, 4, or 5 dice or randomly draw three, four, or five number cards and create as many different numbers as possible. Have your child order the numbers from least to greatest or greatest to least. Have your child choose one of the numbers they created to represent in a variety of ways: expanded form, picture, on a number line, or in word form).
Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Go on a scavenger hunt around the house (or even through different picture books) and find different objects/pictures to represent all the different two and three dimensional figures.
Building
      • Have your child build different two and three dimensional figures with Legos, blocks, cans, boxes, toothpicks, etc.
Physical Activities
      • While doing physical activities (e.g. walking from one end of a room to another, hopping, jumping jacks, going up and down stairs), keep track by skip counting by 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s, and 10s,. If you have access to an outdoor space, have your child create a hopscotch path. If you’re indoors, create a number path by writing on cardboard boxes or sheets of paper and have students count by different amounts.
Cooking and Food
      • Have your child help out in the kitchen by measuring out ingredients and examine the different size measuring cups and explain why ½ is larger than ⅓ and why ⅛ is less than ¼ and how they know. Have your child identify information from the nutritional facts and solve problems such as if you had 3 servings of these cookies, how many calories would that be? How many milligrams of sodium are in the entire box of cereal? How do you know?
Shopping and Money
      • Grab a handful of coins and have students determine the total value of the coins. After students determine the value of the collection, have your child determine how much more money would be needed to make a one or two dollars. Select an amount of change and have your child think of all the different coin combinations that would equal that amount of money.

 

Science

INVESTIGATE: 

      • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world. It may sound something like:
      • Does the depth of the water affect its evaporation rate? 
      • How can you make an egg float?
      • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
      • Be sure to make observations and collect data. 
      • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words. 
      • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
      • Research or test your new questions.

 

Social Studies

    • Make daily calendars and timelines
    • Create a map of your neighborhood or school
    • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know
    • Discuss community helpers (firefighters, police officers, hospital staff) and have students write about what these individual contribute to the community
    • Research a historical figure and discuss or write about how they exhibit good citizenship

Literacy

  • Read 20 minutes a day.
  • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
    • an important part of text.
    • a connection made to the text.
    • a question about the text.
    • the problem and resolution of the story (literary text only - fiction, poetry, drama).
    • the central idea and details to support it (informational texts only - nonfiction, persuasive).
    • a conclusion that can be drawn from the text.
    • something that could be added to the text to extend its message.

 

Math

Sorting and Counting
      • Have your child take inventory of something in your house. (silverware, legos, books, socks, art supplies, tools, stickers, etc.)
      • Have students make an inventory sheet to show how many of each item
      • Ask: How can you organize your counting?
      • Ask: Is there a way to group the items to count easier?
Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Give students a list of two and three dimensional figures and geometric terms (edge, vertice, face, side, cone, cylinder, sphere, rectangular prism, triangle, square, rectangle, rhombus, parallelogram, trapezoid, pentagon, hexagon, and octagon) for students to go on a scavenger hunt in and around their home to find. 
Real World Problems
      • Give your child an addition or subtraction number sentence ( 43 + 76 or 321 - 89) and have students find something in or around their home or in a book to create a word problem to match the equation. Then have your child solve the problem.
Shopping and Money
Grab a handful of coins and have students identify the value of each coin and the total value of the handful. After students determine the value of the collection, have your child determine how much more money would be needed to make a dollar. Select an amount of change and have your child think of all the different coin combinations that would equal that amount of money.

 

Science

INVESTIGATE: 

      • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world.   It may sound something like:
        • Does the color of a crayon affect its melting rate? 
        • Do oranges float or sink in water?
      • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
      • Be sure to make observations and collect data.
      • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words.
      • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
      • Research or test your new questions.

 

Social Studies

    • Make daily calendars and timelines
    • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know
    • Discuss community helpers (firefighters, police officers, hospital staff)
    • Share age-appropriate articles and newspapers and discuss what you notice
    • Practice using globes and maps (physical or online)

Literacy

    • Identify letters in the alphabet and the sound they make.
      Read
      High Frequency Words (1st grade levels D-I).
    • Read 20+ minutes a day.
    • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
      • favorite part of the text.
      • an important part of text.
      • a connection made to the text.
      • a wondering/question about the text.
      • the problem and resolution of the story (literary text only - fiction, poetry, drama).
      • the central idea and details to support it (informational texts only - nonfiction, persuasive).

 

Math

Sorting and Counting
      • Have your child create counting collections of things around home (pasta, paperclips, coins) have students create groups of tens and count the groups of ten and ones to determine the totals.
Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Go on a scavenger hunt around the house (or even through different picture books) and have students identify and name two dimensional and three dimensional figures. Have students sort examples found into categories.
Physical Activities
      • While doing physical activities counting by 2s, 5s, and 10s. If you have access to an outdoor space, have your child create a hopscotch path. If you’re indoors, create a number path by writing on cardboard boxes or sheets of paper switching the counting between ones and tens.
Shopping and Money
      • Grab a handful of coins and have students identify the value of each coin and the total value of the handful. Select an amount of change, 120 cents or less and have students think of all the different coin combinations that would equal that amount of money.

 

Science 

    • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world.  It may sound something like:
      • What is the best way to clean a penny?
      • Which liquid will dissolve a marshmallow (sugar cube) fastest?
    • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
    • Be sure to make observations and collect data. 
    • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words. 
    • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
    • Research or test your new questions

 

Social Studies

    • Make daily calendars and timelines
    • Discuss rules, who makes rules, and how rules are enforced
    • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know
    • Discuss community helpers (firefighters, police officers, hospital staff)

Literacy

    • Identify letters in the alphabet and the sound they make.
      Read
      High Frequency Words (Kinder levels A-D).
    • Read 20+ minutes a day.
    • While reading or after reading, write/draw:
      • favorite part/favorite character of the text.
      • an important part of text.
      • a connection made to the text.
      • a wondering (question) about the text.

 

Math

Sorting and Counting
      • Have your child sort and count cutlery, kitchen utensils, toys, laundry, and more.
      • Some questions you can ask include, “Where should this item go?”, “How did you know which group to put the items in?”, “How many...?” and “Which group has more items?”
Environmental Shape or Pattern Hunt
      • Go on a scavenger hunt around the house (or even through different picture books) and keep track of the different shapes or patterns you find. 
Physical Activities
      • While doing physical activities (e.g. walking from one end of a room to another, hopping, jumping jacks, going up and down stairs), keep track by counting both forwards and backwards. If you have access to an outdoor space, have your child create a hopscotch path. If you’re indoors, create a number path by writing on cardboard boxes or sheets of paper.
Cooking and Food
      • Have your child help out in the kitchen by counting or measuring out ingredients. You can also have your child count out cups, plates, crackers, cookies, marshmallows, slices of pizza, juice boxes, sandwiches and more.

 

Science

INVESTIGATE: 

      • Create a question about an organism, object, or event that can be observed in the natural world.  It may sound something like:
        • How can you make a ping pong ball float?
        • Does the color of water affect the time it takes to freeze?
      • Plan and conduct a simple investigation to answer your question.
      • Be sure to make observations and collect data. 
      • Record and organize your data using pictures, numbers, and/or words. 
      • Write about what you learned and new questions that you have.
      • Research or test your new questions

 

Social Studies

      • Discuss community helpers (firefighters, police officers, hospital staff)
      • Discuss upcoming holidays and the customs associated with that holiday
      • During daily activities practice with time vocabulary: before, after, next, first, last, yesterday, today, tomorrow
      • Practice using location terms: over, under, near, far, left, and right
      • Look through family albums, photos, and/or artifacts and discuss what students see and know

Students can access online resources through their student's digital backpack within her/his PISD Webdesk to review what they have learned so far this year.

All Content

Previously taught skills for home practice:

Language and Communication, Math, Physical Development, Reading and Writing, Science, Sensory and Art, Social and Emotional

Resource: Circle Activity Collection: Family (This link is not in the Student Digital Backpack)

Guidance/Information:

    • Create a free account.
    • Choose the appropriate age range of student(s).
    • Explore and complete activities.

Literacy

Previously taught skills for home practice:

    • Reading and Writing > Story Elements > Character, Setting
    • Reading and Writing > Phonics>Rhyming Words
    • Reading and Writing > Word>Compound Words
    • Reading and Writing > Comprehension > Inferences, Predictions, Sequencing, Cause & Effect
    • Resource: Brain Pop, Jr.

Guidance/Information:

    • Once in Brain Pop Jr, see “Previously taught skills for home practice” column. 
    • Click on the topic and skill listed. 
    • Watch the video and choose an activity or game to complete. 
    • Guardian assistance may be needed with videos, activities, and games.

Math

Previously taught skills for home practice:

    • Math > Number Sense,
    • Addition and Subtraction > Basic Adding, Basic Subtractions

Resource: Brain Pop, Jr.

Guidance/Information: 

    • Once in Brain Pop Jr, see “Previously taught skills for home practice” column. 
    • Click on the topic and skill listed. 
    • Watch the video and choose an activity or game to complete. 
    • Guardian assistance may be needed with videos, activities, and games.

 

Science

Previously taught skills for home practice:

Science > Animals, Plants, Conservation, Weather, Be Well, Be Safe, Be Responsible, Bodies, Teeth, Food

Resource: BrainPop, Jr.

Guidance/Information: 

    • Once in Brain Pop Jr, see “Previously taught skills for home practice” column. 
    • Click on the topic and skill listed. 
    • Watch the video and choose an activity or game to complete. 
    • Guardian assistance may be needed with videos, activities, and games.

 

Social Studies

Previously taught skills for home practice: 

    • Social Studies > Holidays,
    • Communities, Feelings

Resource: BrainPop, Jr.

Guidance/Information:

    • Once in Brain Pop Jr, see “Previously taught skills for home practice” column. 
    • Click on the topic and skill listed. 
    • Watch the video and choose an activity or game to complete. 
    • Guardian assistance may be needed with videos, activities, and games.